The Link Between Lucid Dreaming and Chronic Illness

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Are you aware of the concept of lucid dreaming? Maybe you’ve heard about the nightmarish fugue states where people are unable to move as a ghostly/demon being looks at them. That’s lucid dreaming in a nutshell, but it goes so much deeper than that. Continue reading

The Plastic Straw Debate

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Did you know that plastic straws are being banned all across the world? That sounds like an amazing thing for the environment and wildlife. Don’t get me wrong, it is, but in the process, this straw ban is harming millions of disabled people. Most people are able to drink a beverage with or without a straw. It is just a matter of preference. However, for disabled people who have problems in dexterity, holding weight, or need to have their carers help them drink, this poses a huge problem. Straws are an integral way to allow someone to drink any type of beverage, with little difficulty. This ban is literally making drinking impossible for people. Continue reading

The Chronically Care Project

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I am very excited to be able to do a feature on of my best friends today. Her name is Claire and she created the Chronically Care Project. This is the next company that is going on my ‘Top Related Causes Page’. This project is hosted by the Chronically Beautiful, Claire’s blog. She handmakes fleece blankets and gives them away every other week in a giveaway hosted on her Instagram and Facebook pages. Continue reading

Why Advocacy Matters: A Collaboration

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Advocating. What does that exactly mean? Merriam-Webster describes advocacy as one who supports or promotes the interests of a cause or group. An advocate’s goal is to create change where it is needed. Whether this is to promote a change in legislation, public opinion, or to create an environment of support, an advocate fights for their cause. There is not just one type of advocate either. Continue reading

Is Disability A Bad Word?

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In mid April of this year, Clover Moore, the Sydney Lord Mayor, is considering making the word disabled a bad thing. She is being advised by the City Council who is currently trying to modernize their disability policies. The Council advises that the word disability will soon become as bad as the ‘n’ word today. This is offensive to many groups of people and honestly doesn’t relate to the topic. Continue reading

Anxiety and It’s Effects During Pregnancy

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It is widely known that mental health conditions such as anxiety and depression have a genetic base. After writing my article “The Missing Link?”, I began to wonder if anxiety itself has more of a complicated starting, specifically during pregnancy. The goal in doing this research was also founded by the fact that my brother and I were born by an extremely anxious mother. Continue reading

The CDC “Highlights” Opiate guidelines

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The Opiate Crisis. What a toll it has taken on not only my health and well being, but the health and even lives of countless individuals across the United States. The CDC just issued a warning and apology against the misuse of the guidelines that so many doctors and pharmacists have been treating like the law. The thing is, it is not a guideline if people from the CDC are actually coming to the doctors offices and checking in on them. Continue reading

Chronic Illness Linkup: May Edition

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May’s Chronic Illness Linkup by A Chronic Voice has started! I enjoyed participating in last month’s linkup so much that I decided to make this a monthly thing. It seemed like you all appreciated it as well, so why not? The topics for this month are regrouping, investigating, boosting, setting, and reviving. In case this is your first time here, let me quickly explain what a linkup is. On Twitter, @AChVoice hosts a blog link submission page, in which a chronic illness blogger writes about at least three of the topics for that month. The goal is to meet other chronically ill people and look at each other’s blog. Continue reading

AWARE Necklaces

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I wanted to introduce everyone to the newest company that is going up on ‘My Top Related Causes‘ page. The opportunity was presented to me to work with AWARE causes recently. Pierson Williams, the founder of the company, came up with the idea of creating a necklace to raise awareness for mental health. This was because of the way he was exposed to the topic as a child. His mom battles with depression and as a kid, mental health was something normal to talk about and deal with. However, when he grew up, Pierson was astounded to find out that not many people knew of or talked openly about mental health. Continue reading

Learning Disabilities: An Interview

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I have not touched on learning disabilities on this blog yet. Many of you would be to surprised to know that I actually have a diagnosed learning disability as well. My anxiety causes a learning disability in which I forget any and all information when I am put on the spot such as taking a test. It is classified as an emotional disability where my emotionality interferes with my learning ability. Continue reading

Jaquie: Remembering the Girl Who Inspired Thousands

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Today we are talking about something a little more personal for me. On April 29th, I found out that Jaquie from Chronically Jaquie on YouTube died. For those of you who do not know about her, Jaquie was a true chronic illness warrior. She dealt with Mast Cell Activation Disorder, Narcolepsy, POTS, EDS, Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID), Gastroparesis, having multiple feeding tubes, and a Mitochondrial disease, to name a few. Continue reading

Disability Blogger Award

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I have graciously been nominated for the Disability Blogger Award by Rhiann from www.brainlesionandme.com. I was notified by her on one of my recent posts, ‘Amusement Park Rides Banning Disabled People‘ and was very shocked. Thank you so much Rhiann, this means the world to me! This is an award of recognition to those blogging in the chronic illness, mental health, disability, and special needs communities. Continue reading

Hereditary Lymphedema: A Mystery Years in the Making

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A poster of the Lymphatic system that is in my therapist’s office.

I’ve decided to do a post about my most recent diagnosis, Hereditary Lymphedema. Lymphedema around the world is most commonly caused by the disease, Filariasis a parasitic infection. However, my Lymphedema is not caused by Filariasis, but instead, it is caused by faulty genes. There are two types of Lymphedema: Primary (Hereditary) Lymphedema and Secondary Lymphedema. Continue reading

Amusement Park Rides Banning Disabled People

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My favorite thing to do on a hot sunny day was to go to an amusment park. I’m pretty sure most everyone enjoys these types of parks because of all the variety of fun they bring. The food, live shows, games, and shops are all exciting to go to. However, the best part for me was the rides. Any type of ride I loved, yet I lost a big amount of love for these parks today. While I cannot go to these amusement parks anymore due to my disabilities, many other people with disabilities can go. Yet more and more of these people are being turned away and banned from going on these rides just because they are disabled. Continue reading

Sensory Overload: Is it Chronic Illness?

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Sensory overload. For many people, if asked, they would associate the phrase sensory overload with autism. The condition is much less associated from being chronically ill, specifically by having Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or Fibromyalgia. Today, I am going to talk about sensory overload from the viewpoint of chronic illness, since that is why I have it. So, what even is sensory overload? Continue reading

April’s Chronic Illness Linkup

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I found a cool gathering or linkup that happens every month on Twitter for Chronic Illness. It is hosted by ‘A Chronic Voice’ as far as I can tell, and connects chronic illness bloggers to have them write on five different topics for that month. You write about the different topics on your blog and then link the post to the running list. This could also be a great way for you all to get to know more about me. The linkup starts at the beginning of each month and ends at midnight Sidney time on the last day of the month. I thought it would be an interesting thing to try out! So here is April’s Linkup. Continue reading

Why We Need Genetic Research: Importance (Part 2)

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Welcome to Part two of “Why We Need Genetic Research”! If you did not read the last installment of this series, we looked into Gregor Mendel and how the history of researching genetics was born. You can read that post here. Today, we will be discussing why genetic research is important. Continue reading

BearHugs Hug-in-a-Box Gifts

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I wanted to introduce you all to a new company that will be going on the “My Top Related Causes” page. BearHugs is a company that sends out gift boxes for a wide variety of purposes such as movie night, a new baby, pamper yourself, and more. Some common items that you can find in a BearHugs box is fuzzy socks, mugs, tea, and journals. Bearhugs boxes are even personalizable and come in three different sizes. If you choose this option, you will be able to choose what items go in the box as well. Continue reading

Finding Our Beauty Within the Standards

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I’ve just realized that I do not know how the word beauty is officially defined.  Merriam Webster’s describes it as the quality or aggregate of qualities in a person or thing that gives pleasure to the senses or pleasurably exalts the mind or spirit. This is the first result that displays under the word beauty on their page. So beauty obviously is the qualities that “gives pleasure” to someone else. What I find interesting however, is the attention that this description gives to the mental and spiritual aspect of beauty. Continue reading

Throwing Failure to the Curb

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Failure. The mention of the word gives me chills down the spine. Why are we so afraid of failure? The psychological impacts of failure are driven deep down into our memories, where we can remember times that we failed from a very early age. Continue reading

Chronically Cute Cards

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I was on Twitter several days ago when I came across something awesome. There is someone who is making handmade and personalized cards to send out to others with disabilities. I had to check it out! Continue reading

Virginia’s Making Big Strides for Mental Health

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On Monday, the 18th of March, Virginia completed a bill put in action by previous Gov. Terry McAuliffe to make all Community Health Services provide same day access for mental health. There are 40 locations in total that are publicly funded and offer this same day service for adults and children alike. Continue reading

Evie’s Law Continues the Fight for Discrimination-Free Organ Transplants

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Did you know that adults and children alike all over the United States are being denied eligibility for organ transplants? Was it because they couldn’t pay for it, insurance didn’t cover it, or they didn’t meet the requirements? No, these beautiful people are being denied because they have disabilities. They have disabilities such as Down Syndrome and Autism. Doctors have been deciding that these people didn’t have enough quality of life to be worth providing an organ transplant to. Continue reading

Inspecting the Motive for Pain

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Pain. Burning pain. Stabbing Pain. Aching pain. Whatever the pain, it is usually a very common symptom of a chronic illness. In fact, I am in pain as I am writing this right now. Why do some people seem to experience extremely high levels of pain, while others do not? What if I told you that there are some people out there who cannot even experience pain. Continue reading

Shattering the Self Pity Cycle

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How can you break the cycle of self pity? Based on one of my recent articles, “The Black Hole Called Self Pity”, I have received feedback from viewers wanting help in knowing how to stop this vicious cycle. It is a difficult thing to realize that you have gotten caught up in focusing on your troubles. Continue reading

Why We Need Genetic Research: History (Part 1)

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We are going to explore the importance of genetic research in this series. Many diseases are genetically inherited or formed from faulty genes. I have a special interest in the field of genetic research as several of my diagnoses are genetically based. Continue reading

The Black Hole Called Self Pity

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There are not many things that are stronger than the bond that we in the chronic illness community have. Everyone deals with different conditions in different situations, but there are so many resources available to help every person. The thing is, you have to want to help yourself. Self pity is the Achilles Heel of chronic illness. It will never help you to accomplish anything. Continue reading

When Anxiety and Excitement Collide

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Isn’t it just great when you get some exciting news, but it throws you into a panic attack? Ahh, while I just sit here sipping my non-existent cup of coffee, I’m just appreciating my deep love for anxiety. In case that wasn’t clear, that was sarcasm. Continue reading

My Life Is Not A Movie

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There have been several movies that have come out in the recent years that highlight an illness in some way. The problem is, that it is a movie. If I am honest, nobody wants to go to the movies and watch scenes where I have broken down, am feeling suicidal because of the pain that nobody knows how to treat, and the countless days I just spend on the couch. Continue reading